Bucket lists are an ironic benefit to the overtourism problem

I understand that much of the overtourism problem was created by bucket lists in the first place. However, what if it is also used as a form of crowd control? Rather than trying to combat the crowds, which in my opinion is a battle you can’t win, work with them. A recent article in the Telegraph – Have tourists ruined the world? highlighted that although these destinations are suffering from overtourism, you can still wander off the beaten path and into peace & quiet. Continue reading

Verona to Venice

Wondering the streets of Verona and Venice, with no particular direction or aim, is the best way to explore these cities. Both have winding narrow lanes that will open to a plaza, a great bar or small coffee shop. The opportunity to sit, think of nothing and enjoy a wine or a coffee whilst people watching is probably one of the most wonderful things. Continue reading

Overtourism; the 10 causes

Overtourism occurs when the negative aspects outweigh the benefits.

Large numbers of tourists can upset the local residents, especially if income created by a tourism boom doesn’t trickle down but instead leaks out of the country. As destination popularity rises so can the cost of accommodation. Furthermore, the noise disrupts normal life, and places of beauty are spoilt by high numbers of visitors.

But, don’t forget, overtourism doesn’t just affect the local population, the tourist also experiences the consequences of long queues, angry locals, strict restrictions and large crowds.

So why has this all occurred in the summer of 2017? Well, the signs have been around for a while and in places as high as Everest and as far East as The Great Wall of China. But, this summer’s conditions created problems to hit a new high for Europe tourism.

Here are the ten conditions which have led to this epidemic.

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