Last Chance Tourism; Go Before it’s too late!

93% of corals have been impacted by abnormally warm waters. Coral bleaching has spread around the globe, devastating reef mortality and resulting in a sense of urgency amongst some tourists. A feeling of ‘I have to get there before its too late!’ is sweeping across many travellers. This has created a form of tourism that I have come to loathe the most, ‘last-chance Tourism’. It suggests a feeling of hopelessness, that we are too late and nothing can be done. Conservation soon gets replaced by an acceptance of demise and we extract as much as we can before it disappears. This needs to change and fast!

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Conservation Benefits of Captive Animals

The below picture really caught my attention this week. It is an incredibly provocative example of our relationship with animals. How does it make you feel? Does it make you want to support the conservation of orangutans or fight to put this one back in the wild?

orangutan

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Cecils Death, The Media Hype!

What a month and half its been for wildlife conservation! But it seems things are now starting to calm down giving us all some time to catch our breath, brush ourselves down and reflect on recent events. Since Cecil the Lion’s death the media have had a field day and long shall it last! The more publicity this story gets the larger the audiences conservation will be attracted. It’s a welcome step away from the economy and towards subjects that really matter. However, over the past month, an uncomfortable concern has been growing on how beneficial the media really is, especially in relation to its impacts. This time of calm is a good opportunity to revisit the case of Cecil, look back over the medias role and perhaps reinvigorate the hunting argument.

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The eviction of Tanzania’s tourism pin-ups, the Maasai

It was only early this week that I was discussing how Botswana had relocated San populations to make way for safari parks and tourism. Then a couple of days later I was shocked to hear the Tanzanian government were also planning a similar eviction by removing the Maasai once again. It appears as if the dark side of safari tourism is creeping from out of the shadows. Local populations are relocated to allow tourists to enjoy what Africa has to offer, amazing wildlife views, conserved landscapes and unfortunately in this case the opportunity to hunt.

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