Is Cognitive Dissonance Good for Business?

Maybe. If you’re prepared to try a purpose-driven strategy.

A fairly pessimistic article titled ‘Are Brands Overvaluaing Authenticity and Social Purpose?‘ suggested, whilst consumers demand more authentic, sustainable and socially positive businesses, in the end, ‘purpose’ will not drive their decision making. Product and price weigh far heavier. But, it doesn’t account for an alternative impact of cognitive dissonance and ignores a critical factor in the marketing funnel, word-of -mouth.

Although, the article does raise a legitimate question and one that should be explored when companies are considering their values and mission. Purpose-driven marketing needs to be authentic and come from the organisation’s core, aligned with the value proposition or the ‘Why’. Starting a purpose-driven marketing strategy to generate business moves your purpose away from cause and closer to making money. People will sniff out inauthenticity instantly, and the organisation will suffer as a result.

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Survival Of The Fittest Green Business

Aligning with peoples emotions will develop trust & loyalty, securing the survival of the fittest green business.

Multiple times we’re disappointed in Governments effectiveness to fight climate change. We will never know if climate change promises are fulfilled unless we can hold them accountable. Continue reading

Purpose Driven Marketing

Covid-19 has incentivised many brands to ramp up their social purpose, relaxing competitiveness in favour of co-operation. Businesses shouldn’t be looking to attract shoppers, but fans who buy into a shared value system.

The community in which your business operates is your success and your revenue. The success of your business depends on the health, wealth and happiness of this community, which means its time to invest in them!

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Meghalaya and Assam, North India

This time roles were reversed, I was planning this trip for my father. A motorbike tour designed for real adventure, which we got in bucket loads!

A loosely planned journey! Forgetting to zoom in on the computer, we soon found out that our root weaved across the Indian and Bangladeshi border. It also traversed a region that had been impacted by terrorist attacks a year before our visit. Border guards and police threatened to halt our journey, and we ended up staying the night in a jungle station on the kitchen table. Our motorbikes were louder than the locals, explained a police officer with a big gun. Anybody wanting to make a quick buck from stupid tourists would have heard us a mile away. Despite all that, we completed our trip and made it to our destination, the living root bridges of Meghalaya.

Bucket lists are an ironic benefit to the overtourism problem

I understand that much of the overtourism problem was created by bucket lists in the first place. However, what if it is also used as a form of crowd control? Rather than trying to combat the crowds, which in my opinion is a battle you can’t win, work with them. A recent article in the Telegraph – Have tourists ruined the world? highlighted that although these destinations are suffering from overtourism, you can still wander off the beaten path and into peace & quiet. Continue reading

Verona to Venice

Wondering the streets of Verona and Venice, with no particular direction or aim, is the best way to explore these cities. Both have winding narrow lanes that will open to a plaza, a great bar or small coffee shop. The opportunity to sit, think of nothing and enjoy a wine or a coffee whilst people watching is probably one of the most wonderful things.

These cities are designed to make you fall in love. Maybe leave that for another trip, I think you will enjoy getting lost even more!