About

Keeping up with the changing trends, new innovations, amazing successes within responsible tourism is difficult. This blog is designed to discuss the most poignant story I have found in the week of responsible and sustainable tourism news. Each blog will raise and answer questions to highlight the truths or inaccuracies. I hope my blog will inspire others towards new projects and campaigns.

Don’t miss, sign up to my blog below. If you would like to get responsible tourism news that’s closer to its time of happening, follow me on twitter to the right of this blog.

Leave a comment, I welcome discussions on the stories that I post and to share ideas and news that I have missed. Perhaps you have other views? Its always best to share and I look forward to sharing some great responsible tourism stories with you.

Saul

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2 thoughts on “About

  1. I work with a citizens’ initiative named Ohrid SOS. We hope to inform a more responsible travel industry in the UNESCO Ohrid region of the Republic of Macedonia. Here is Lake Ohrid, one of the most species rich lakes on earth by surface area, and Mount Galichica, a national park that also harbors very high biodiversity. Some of the flora and fauna exist nowhere else in the world, so it’s a really special location.

    Tourism is an important industry to the region and many people depend upon it. However, recent plans have been to increase accommodation and activities by draining wetlands, cutting apart the national park with an express road and ski-resort, and multiple lake shore developments, all of which pose large-scale dangers not only to habitats and species, but ultimately to UNESCO status too.

    So far, Ohrid SOS, other organizations and supportive members of the public have managed to hold off these worrying plans, but it is crucial both to provide more benign tourism alternatives and to discuss tourism from many different angles so that a more complete understanding of its costs and benefits comes forward. Too often, benefits are presented, but losses–such as water quality deficiencies if the wetland is urbanized at Lake Ohrid–are not considered. This doesn’t just hide ecological concerns but economic ones too, because when environmental damage becomes serious, people will have to pay to prevent the situation from getting worse.

    Seeing blogs like this that look to present a more balanced picture of tourism is really positive and there are some thoughtful ideas contained within, which will help organizations like ours. I look forward to reading more.

    Like

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